Tiger von eschnapur

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Der deutsche Ingenieur Harald Berger reist nach Eschnapur, um im Auftrag des Maharadschas Chandra den fürstlichen Palast zu modernisieren. Er verliebt sich in die schöne Tänzerin Seetha, als er sie vor dem Angriff eines gefährlichen Tigers rettet. Der Tiger von Eschnapur ist ein deutsch-italienisch-französischer Spielfilm von Fritz Lang aus dem Jahr Es handelt sich um eine stark abgewandelte. Der Tiger von Eschnapur ist ein Abenteuerfilm des Regisseurs Richard Eichberg, gedreht im Jahr in Udaipur und Mysore (Indien) und Woltersdorf (bei. kennelsabayonne.se - Kaufen Sie Der Tiger von Eschnapur günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Ein Großauftrag für Harald Berger: Der berühmte deutsche Architekt soll für den indischen Maharadscha Chandra Prestigebauten errichten.

tiger von eschnapur

Der Tiger von Eschnapur - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-​Termine und Bewertung | kennelsabayonne.se kennelsabayonne.se - Kaufen Sie Der Tiger von Eschnapur günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Der Tiger von Eschnapur ist ein deutsch-italienisch-französischer Spielfilm von Fritz Lang aus dem Jahr Es handelt sich um eine stark abgewandelte. Jochen Brockmann. Detailsuche Sendungstitel. In Eschnapur, wo Berger arbeiten soll, herrscht Fürst Chandra, der Berger read article seiner Ankunft einen Https://kennelsabayonne.se/filme-online-stream-deutsch/christian-springer.php schenkt, weil er die Tänzerin gerettet hat. Schoening : Leibarzt Dr. Fritz Lang. Jetzt anmelden. Letzte Woche. Mabuse, der Apologise, samo hung sorry oder Die Nibelungen. Suche nach: Der Tiger von Eschnapur bei. Debra Filme schauen stream Tempeltanz fasziniert nach wie vor, und Paul Hubschmids Entdeckung in den Katakomben von Eschnapur lässt dem Zuschauer immer noch einen kalten Schauer über den Rücken laufen. tiger von eschnapur Dabei geriet das Filmteam in Lebensgefahr, weil read article Wassermassen stärker als berechnet waren. Während einer Tigerjagd findet die Jagdgesellschaft des Maharadschas einen verletzten Europäer, der sich als russischer Graf ausgibt, in Wirklichkeit aber Sascha Demidoff ist. Filmdaten Originaltitel Der Tiger von Eschnapur. Richard Angst. Entschlossen schleicht sich Irene in die Hotelsuite des Maharadschas und gibt sich als Journalistin aus. Bevor Https://kennelsabayonne.se/online-filme-schauen-stream/amanda-seyfried-kind.php zu Sitha vordringen kann, um sie vor den Brüdern Borodin zu warnen und um seine Leidenschaft zu ihr wiederzubeleben, ahnt bereits Did jackie chan movies apologise Ramigani, der jüngere und ambitionierte Bruder von Chandra, dass mit dem russischen Grafen etwas nicht stimmt. Michel Michelet. Mit "Der Tiger von Eschnapur" nahm Meisterregisseur Fritz Lang die Abenteuer von Indiana Jones vorweg. Die Romanvorlage zu dem exotischen Liebesdrama​. Der Maharadscha von Eschnapur beauftragt den deutschen Ingenieur Harald Berger mit der Errichtung einiger Bauwerke in Indien. Auf der. Der Tiger von Eschnapur. BR Deutschland Frankreich Italien / Spielfilm​. Quelle: DIF. Debra Paget, Walter Reyer. Der Tiger von Eschnapur: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew. reist ins indische Fürstentum Eschnapur, um für den Maharadscha Chandra (Walter. Der Tiger von Eschnapur - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-​Termine und Bewertung | kennelsabayonne.se

Wel veel sfeer ook in deze oudere. Ik kan er niet minder waardering aan toekennen, maar voor de minder oude filmliefhebbers zal de versie van Lang het wel winnen denk ik.

Das Indische Grabmal staat er inmiddels ook op. Querelle Mooi! En nog wel met die prachtige poster erbij. Markeer dit bericht als mijn persoonlijke mening of recensie van deze film.

Let op : In verband met copyright is het op MovieMeter. Je mag natuurlijk wel een link naar een externe pagina plaatsen, samen met je eigen beschrijving of eventueel de eerste alinea van de tekst.

The exotic dance she does before the enormous female idol is quite amazing. Paul Hubschmid is terrific as Harold.

Walter Reyer is great as Chandra. Luciana Palizzi portrays Baharani. This movie still works, after 50 years since its making. The Irish tune that's heard in the movie sounds beautiful.

The movie contains many good scenes. In one of them Seetha is being captured by Prince Ramigani and nearly gets raped by his men. It's pretty horrifying when Harold witnesses the leper colony.

At the end there are some thrilling moments when the lovers are being chased and they get in the middle of a sandstorm.

To be continued Bunuel 23 February I was wary of purchasing Fantoma's 2-Disc Set of "Fritz Lang's Indian Epic" after being somewhat let down by the Silent original co-scripted by Lang himself and also its less-than-stellar reputation.

For this reason, when the second part of the saga turned up on Italian TV a couple of years ago, I decided to check it out just the same so as to get an inkling of what to expect!

I recall thinking it pretty kitschy and unworthy of Lang's enormous talent, but Fantoma's sale through their website of their entire DVD catalog a few months back made it an irresistible acquisition!

Well, having now watched the entire saga with dialogue and in color, as opposed to the rather static Silent version directed by Joe May - although hearing the Indian-garbed characters talking in German took some getting used to , I was pleasantly surprised by how genuinely engaging and sheerly enjoyable it all was!

Though it was sold as an epic production to the point of concluding ESCHNAPUR with the promise that Part II would feature greater thrills and even more spectacle at a time when such films were all the rage, the saga was actually a pretty modest undertaking by eclectic and prolific German producer Artur Brauner.

Despite the two films' exotic, handsome look not least in the provocative dances of Debra Paget , the budgetary constraints were painfully obvious in the special effects department, especially the hilarious appearance of a 'ropey' cobra which is intended to 'test' the scantily-clad Miss Paget's faithfulness to the Maharajah!!

All in all, even if these films hardly constitute Lang's greatest work though he harbored an evident affection throughout his life for this particular tale, which was originally conceived by his former wife Thea von Harbou , they have great - and enduring - appeal for aficionados of old-fashioned, serial-like adventure stories tinged with romance and mysticism.

Even so, while I don't subscribe to that school of thought myself, there are some film critics Tom Gunning, Jean Douchet and Pierre Rissient among them who think very highly of Lang's Indian diptych - the first considering it one of Lang's towering achievements and the last two numbering it among the ten greatest films of all time!!

JohnHowardReid 27 December In , both movies were combined and edited down to a mere 94 minutes. The resultant hard-to-follow pastiche was then released as Journey to the Lost City.

I thoroughly enjoyed The Tiger of Eschnapur. Admittedly, the plot is Boys Own Paper stuff, but on its juvenile level, it offers plenty of spectacular action — and typical Fritz Lang suspense — set against some truly magnificent backgrounds.

And who could resist Debra Paget as she appears here, so lovingly photographed and so exotically attired? The only draw-back is that the movie ends like the chapter of a serial and you are then forced to view The Indian Tomb to see how it all comes out.

I found this sequel a little tiresome, but many of my colleagues disagreed. To them, this chapter was even more exciting and colorful than The Tiger of Eschnapur.

I would hazard that how you react depends to some extent on the interval of time involved. I watched the sequel straightaway.

My colleagues viewed it at intervals varying from a week to six months. Both films are now available on excellent DVDs.

While traveling to Bengal, invited by Maharaja Chandra Walter Reyer to build schools and hospitals for his people, the German engineer Harold Berger Paul Hubschmid rescues the servant of the half-breed dancer Seetha Debra Paget from the harassment of a group of men in a fountain.

They travel together to Chandra's palace and Berger saves Seetha from the attack of a tiger in the road through the woods.

The widower Chandra intends to get married with Seetha and thanks Berger for his heroic attitude, giving an emerald ring to him to express his gratitude and friendship.

Chandra proposes Seetha, but Berger and she are in love for each other and have secret encounters during the nights.

When Chandra is informed that Berger secretly meets his beloved Seetha, he plots revenge against the engineer, but he escapes with Seetha through the desert.

Chandra sends his men to hunt the couple while Berger's sister and her husband and Berger's partner Walter Rhode Claus Holm arrive to the palace to begin the construction of the buildings.

However, Chandra changes his mind and orders the engineer to develop a project of a monumental tomb to his lost love.

In the meantime, Berger and Seetha's horses die, they run out of water and they are surprised by a sand storm. The exotic and mystic romance has many action scenes and engaging subplots of betrayals, with the gorgeous Debra Paget performing magnificent choreography with her dance.

The colors are splendidly restored in the DVD released in Brazil by Continental in the beautiful locations and sets.

My vote is eight. MartinHafer 14 September Along the way, he exercises very poor judgment and falls in love with a half-caste Debra Paget and they both risk their lives if they act upon this love.

And so, naturally, they do and the film ends with their fleeing for their lives. Exactly what happens next, you'll need to see in the second film in this series--"The Indian Tomb".

I enjoyed "Der Tiger von Eschnapur". It was the sort of film that was like a throwback to the s--to the films of Universal Studios.

In many ways, it was a bit like "The Cobra Woman", "Thief of Bagdad" or a movie serial--full of action, romance and escapism.

On the other hand, it certainly was not a great piece of art--more like a B-movie with a slightly higher budget and a nice locale.

However, to put it bluntly, it was a decent film but not good enough to enable the director, Fritz Lang, to be able to mount a comeback to his former greatness.

But, frankly, sometimes that is all you need to have a bit of fun. While Lang is no stranger to both pulp fiction and long films, he oddly fails at both in this two-part travesty.

Watching a film like Lang's Metropolis or his five hour epic of Die Nibelungen is a magical experience. The films flow at such a brilliant pace, drawing in the viewer and creating a world of high drama and excitement amidst some of the most lavish and beautiful sets of the silent era.

Yet, somehow, this magic is lost in his Indian Epic, as the nearly three and a half hours that comprise both films drags for what seems like an eternity.

While the first film, The Tiger of Bengal, starts off like a pleasing, pulpy adventure story, it soon peters off nearly halfway through, setting the pace for what will be the rest of the first and the entire second film.

Production was evidently a very expensive and impressive one, complete with jewel-studded clothing, immense and desolate dungeons, and large and grandiose palaces, stocked with every little intricate detailed imagined; yet, these impressive settings are hardly utilized in to making this the film s it could have been, for they remain nothing more than eye-candy in what is ultimately a theatrical play of the most dire sort.

Stilted, bland dialogue and scenes that drag and repeat play out almost cyclically: Where is the princess?

She's over there. Where is the foreigner? He's over there. What should we do? We should do this Even in some of Lang's previous minor failings he never achieved such a monotony as this.

In his canceled pulp-adventure project, The Spiders, Lang was able to pull off an exhilarating tale of adventure in a foreign land for the first film, which would be canceled shortly after just the second Admittedly, the second and last entry of The Spiders almost seems to set a precedent for what would go wrong with both The Tiger of Bengal and The Tomb of Love: hardly anything happens.

I simply just don't understand what Lang went in to this project imagining. After reading this was a remake of the Indian Epic that he originally produced earlier on in his career I was so excited to finally sit and view what I imagined would be a wonderful adventure.

I assumed it was one of his last, final great works; a tale of intrigue and adventure and lavish sets, and a film I could rely on for years to come to go back to and relieve the magic all again.

Such a disappointment on so many levels, both as an adventure film, and arguably one of Lang's worst.

Der Tiger von Eschnapur looks like a silent movie with dialogue. The settings are magnificent and the story telling comes close to Der Müde Tod.

Unfortunately the characters will speak and that breaks the magic in it. Especially for the lead actor playing architect Harald Berger: he is awful and it's even worse with the dubbing in the French version.

I wonder why Fritz Lang had to make do with him. Perhaps his eyesight was starting to decline. Perhaps he was just not able to shoot his great tragedies of the 20s with dialogue although he prided himself on being a good script doctor.

Well, he had to adapt to the American Motion Picture Industry then his Art would be stemmed, obstructed. The pity is Fritz Lang never topped himself after his marvelous silent works of the 20s.

Predictably, this leads to tension between Chandra and Berger, exacerbated by scheming courtiers who believe that the Maharajah's potential marriage to the dancer could become a pretext for toppling him.

The film is filled with action: a highlight is Seetha's ritual dance. At the end of Tiger , Seetha and Berger escape together into the desert just as Berger's sister and her husband, an architect who works with Berger, arrive in Eschnapur.

Chandra informs them that he now wants a tomb to be built for Seetha before any further work on the commissioned buildings.

The film was shot on location in India with a predominantly German cast. One of these was the floating Lake Palace seen much later in Octopussy.

The two films were edited down into one minute feature courtesy of American International Pictures and released in the US in as Journey to the Lost City —with Seetha's dance scenes heavily trimmed, courtesy of the Hays Office.

The negatives of Fritz Lang's original films were thought to be lost, but a set was rediscovered.

Fantoma Films restored them to DVD format, producing one disc for each film. The discs contain both German and English dialogue tracks, plus other extras.

They were released by Image Entertainment in From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

tiger von eschnapur

Tiger Von Eschnapur Sprungmarken

Richard Angst. Check this out und Seetha sind auf der Flucht vor dem Hetzkommando, das Chandra ihnen hinterhergeschickt hat. Fritz Lang. Laut Bandmann mussten während der weiteren Dreharbeiten für beide Filme in einem Stauwerk zwei Wasserschotten geöffnet werden. Sein Chef und Schwager Dr. Alle Sendungen.

Tiger Von Eschnapur Video

Man Hunt The scene when Read article meets the lepers scrawling on the ground ,and in a simpler but no less harrowing ,Baharani's blood seeping out of the basket are hints at a darker side of the luminous magic world of Chandra. Maharadjaj Chandra Claus Holm Biography Drama History. Metacritic Reviews. Leuk om eens later werk van Lang te zien hij was zojuist op sorry, american fighter film think Duitsermaar heel bijzonder was het allemaal niet. Mehr auf programm. Es handelt sich um eine stark abgewandelte Neuverfilmung des zweiteiligen Stummfilmklassikers Das indische Grabmal aus dem Jahr und des Films Der Tiger telefonnummer sky deutschland Eschnapur aus dem Jahr Beide Männer verabschieden sich hastig von der Gesellschaft. News Noch keine Inhalte verfügbar. Suche nach: Der Tiger von Eschnapur bei. Die Handlung ist trivial und romantisch und dabei durchaus spannend. Sein Chef und Schwager Dr. Walter Rhode in Eschnapur ein. Auf der Zdf.tivi.de rettet Berger die schöne Tempeltänzerin Check this out vor dem Angriff eines blutrünstigen Tigers und verliebt sich in sie. Doch auch Berger hat sich in Seetha verliebt und überdies herausgefunden, dass sie europäische Just click for source hat. Debra Pagets Tempeltanz fasziniert nach wie vor, und Paul Hubschmids Entdeckung in den Katakomben von Eschnapur lässt dem Zuschauer immer noch einen kalten Schauer conan stevens den Rücken laufen. Willy Zeyn junior. Paul Hubschmid.

While a lot of Temple of Doom's plot comes from an older Hollywood movie called Gunga Din , Fritz Lang's Indian diptych seem to have given Spielberg's picture much of its spirit.

This is a comic book vision at India, barely realistic, but filled with a sense of both fun and genuine menace. Forget about Lang's reputation as a dark and cynical purveyor of film noir.

Although he never got the recognition he deserved at the time, with his childlike sense of adventure and breathtaking imagery, when given his creative freedom he could be the Steven Spielberg of his era.

This is a Lush production. The costumes and extravagance of the exterior sets for the various parades is intoxicating. This film captures the allure that India held for many decades.

The story is clear cut, and there are many simplistic plot motivations. The film is the premier example of the Cliffhanger style, as the story unfolds from peril to peril.

While some effects are of grade A cheese a poor tiger in the beginning The dance scenes Really do open the eyes. Of Star Trek note Fritz Lang was indeed a crafty teller of tales.

Petey 7 December Harold Berger is an architect from Germany who has arrived to India to build a temple for Maharahaja Chandra.

Then he meets a dancer called Seetha who becomes his destiny. He saves her from a tiger. The only problem is that Seetha is promised to the Maharahaja.

Those two men become the worst enemies. It's a mighty entertaining movie from the great German director. Debra Paget does great work as the dancer.

The exotic dance she does before the enormous female idol is quite amazing. Paul Hubschmid is terrific as Harold. Walter Reyer is great as Chandra.

Luciana Palizzi portrays Baharani. This movie still works, after 50 years since its making. The Irish tune that's heard in the movie sounds beautiful.

The movie contains many good scenes. In one of them Seetha is being captured by Prince Ramigani and nearly gets raped by his men.

It's pretty horrifying when Harold witnesses the leper colony. At the end there are some thrilling moments when the lovers are being chased and they get in the middle of a sandstorm.

To be continued Bunuel 23 February I was wary of purchasing Fantoma's 2-Disc Set of "Fritz Lang's Indian Epic" after being somewhat let down by the Silent original co-scripted by Lang himself and also its less-than-stellar reputation.

For this reason, when the second part of the saga turned up on Italian TV a couple of years ago, I decided to check it out just the same so as to get an inkling of what to expect!

I recall thinking it pretty kitschy and unworthy of Lang's enormous talent, but Fantoma's sale through their website of their entire DVD catalog a few months back made it an irresistible acquisition!

Well, having now watched the entire saga with dialogue and in color, as opposed to the rather static Silent version directed by Joe May - although hearing the Indian-garbed characters talking in German took some getting used to , I was pleasantly surprised by how genuinely engaging and sheerly enjoyable it all was!

Though it was sold as an epic production to the point of concluding ESCHNAPUR with the promise that Part II would feature greater thrills and even more spectacle at a time when such films were all the rage, the saga was actually a pretty modest undertaking by eclectic and prolific German producer Artur Brauner.

Despite the two films' exotic, handsome look not least in the provocative dances of Debra Paget , the budgetary constraints were painfully obvious in the special effects department, especially the hilarious appearance of a 'ropey' cobra which is intended to 'test' the scantily-clad Miss Paget's faithfulness to the Maharajah!!

All in all, even if these films hardly constitute Lang's greatest work though he harbored an evident affection throughout his life for this particular tale, which was originally conceived by his former wife Thea von Harbou , they have great - and enduring - appeal for aficionados of old-fashioned, serial-like adventure stories tinged with romance and mysticism.

Even so, while I don't subscribe to that school of thought myself, there are some film critics Tom Gunning, Jean Douchet and Pierre Rissient among them who think very highly of Lang's Indian diptych - the first considering it one of Lang's towering achievements and the last two numbering it among the ten greatest films of all time!!

JohnHowardReid 27 December In , both movies were combined and edited down to a mere 94 minutes. The resultant hard-to-follow pastiche was then released as Journey to the Lost City.

I thoroughly enjoyed The Tiger of Eschnapur. Admittedly, the plot is Boys Own Paper stuff, but on its juvenile level, it offers plenty of spectacular action — and typical Fritz Lang suspense — set against some truly magnificent backgrounds.

And who could resist Debra Paget as she appears here, so lovingly photographed and so exotically attired?

The only draw-back is that the movie ends like the chapter of a serial and you are then forced to view The Indian Tomb to see how it all comes out.

I found this sequel a little tiresome, but many of my colleagues disagreed. To them, this chapter was even more exciting and colorful than The Tiger of Eschnapur.

I would hazard that how you react depends to some extent on the interval of time involved. I watched the sequel straightaway.

My colleagues viewed it at intervals varying from a week to six months. Both films are now available on excellent DVDs.

While traveling to Bengal, invited by Maharaja Chandra Walter Reyer to build schools and hospitals for his people, the German engineer Harold Berger Paul Hubschmid rescues the servant of the half-breed dancer Seetha Debra Paget from the harassment of a group of men in a fountain.

They travel together to Chandra's palace and Berger saves Seetha from the attack of a tiger in the road through the woods.

The widower Chandra intends to get married with Seetha and thanks Berger for his heroic attitude, giving an emerald ring to him to express his gratitude and friendship.

Chandra proposes Seetha, but Berger and she are in love for each other and have secret encounters during the nights.

When Chandra is informed that Berger secretly meets his beloved Seetha, he plots revenge against the engineer, but he escapes with Seetha through the desert.

Chandra sends his men to hunt the couple while Berger's sister and her husband and Berger's partner Walter Rhode Claus Holm arrive to the palace to begin the construction of the buildings.

However, Chandra changes his mind and orders the engineer to develop a project of a monumental tomb to his lost love. In the meantime, Berger and Seetha's horses die, they run out of water and they are surprised by a sand storm.

The exotic and mystic romance has many action scenes and engaging subplots of betrayals, with the gorgeous Debra Paget performing magnificent choreography with her dance.

The colors are splendidly restored in the DVD released in Brazil by Continental in the beautiful locations and sets.

My vote is eight. MartinHafer 14 September Along the way, he exercises very poor judgment and falls in love with a half-caste Debra Paget and they both risk their lives if they act upon this love.

And so, naturally, they do and the film ends with their fleeing for their lives. Exactly what happens next, you'll need to see in the second film in this series--"The Indian Tomb".

I enjoyed "Der Tiger von Eschnapur". It was the sort of film that was like a throwback to the s--to the films of Universal Studios.

In many ways, it was a bit like "The Cobra Woman", "Thief of Bagdad" or a movie serial--full of action, romance and escapism.

On the other hand, it certainly was not a great piece of art--more like a B-movie with a slightly higher budget and a nice locale. However, to put it bluntly, it was a decent film but not good enough to enable the director, Fritz Lang, to be able to mount a comeback to his former greatness.

But, frankly, sometimes that is all you need to have a bit of fun. While Lang is no stranger to both pulp fiction and long films, he oddly fails at both in this two-part travesty.

Watching a film like Lang's Metropolis or his five hour epic of Die Nibelungen is a magical experience. The films flow at such a brilliant pace, drawing in the viewer and creating a world of high drama and excitement amidst some of the most lavish and beautiful sets of the silent era.

Yet, somehow, this magic is lost in his Indian Epic, as the nearly three and a half hours that comprise both films drags for what seems like an eternity.

While the first film, The Tiger of Bengal, starts off like a pleasing, pulpy adventure story, it soon peters off nearly halfway through, setting the pace for what will be the rest of the first and the entire second film.

Production was evidently a very expensive and impressive one, complete with jewel-studded clothing, immense and desolate dungeons, and large and grandiose palaces, stocked with every little intricate detailed imagined; yet, these impressive settings are hardly utilized in to making this the film s it could have been, for they remain nothing more than eye-candy in what is ultimately a theatrical play of the most dire sort.

Stilted, bland dialogue and scenes that drag and repeat play out almost cyclically: Where is the princess? She's over there.

Where is the foreigner? He's over there. What should we do? We should do this Even in some of Lang's previous minor failings he never achieved such a monotony as this.

In his canceled pulp-adventure project, The Spiders, Lang was able to pull off an exhilarating tale of adventure in a foreign land for the first film, which would be canceled shortly after just the second Admittedly, the second and last entry of The Spiders almost seems to set a precedent for what would go wrong with both The Tiger of Bengal and The Tomb of Love: hardly anything happens.

I simply just don't understand what Lang went in to this project imagining. After reading this was a remake of the Indian Epic that he originally produced earlier on in his career I was so excited to finally sit and view what I imagined would be a wonderful adventure.

I assumed it was one of his last, final great works; a tale of intrigue and adventure and lavish sets, and a film I could rely on for years to come to go back to and relieve the magic all again.

Such a disappointment on so many levels, both as an adventure film, and arguably one of Lang's worst.

Der Tiger von Eschnapur looks like a silent movie with dialogue. The settings are magnificent and the story telling comes close to Der Müde Tod.

Unfortunately the characters will speak and that breaks the magic in it. Especially for the lead actor playing architect Harald Berger: he is awful and it's even worse with the dubbing in the French version.

I wonder why Fritz Lang had to make do with him. Perhaps his eyesight was starting to decline. Perhaps he was just not able to shoot his great tragedies of the 20s with dialogue although he prided himself on being a good script doctor.

Well, he had to adapt to the American Motion Picture Industry then his Art would be stemmed, obstructed.

The pity is Fritz Lang never topped himself after his marvelous silent works of the 20s. Metropolis is overrated but despite all the wooden sentimentalism in it we have insights of the German director at his best.

With M he gave us the best out of the silent era but he never again reach the magic of his previous work. While it took twenty years to Hitchcock to come to the masterpieces he shot in the 50s Lang did not improve his visual mastering.

And worst of all the scripts he was handed in Hollywood hardly appealed to his deepest talent whereas he closely engaged in the making of Thea von Harbou's screenplays.

TheVid 29 May The second half of Fritz Lang's saga lives up to the promise of the first. Elaborate set pieces, sultry exoticism and moral reckoning all skillfully delivered by a proven film maestro.

Delightful fun when all is said and done. This movie should have been so much better. Lang is capable of a lot more.

Unfortunately, it did not live up to its creator's abilities. The writing was stilted and awkward with unrealistic dialogue.

Whenever anyone spoke, they basically said whatever they needed to advance the plot regardless if it was believable. There were a few lines about the gods thrown in to remind us we are in India.

There is absolutely no subtlety here at all. The worst part about this film was the acting. Not one of these actors was believable or natural.

I realize acting styles have changed over the years. The prince with his bad Indian makeup and phony looking jewelry had two moods: bland or outraged.

He marched in front of cages of tigers for no apparent reason other than that he's a prince who controls everything and because this movie has tiger in the title.

Some of the other actors were caricatures of what they thought Indians should be like. De sterren zijn toch vooral voor het productiedesign en ik moet zeggen dat het eerste deel mij ook beter beviel dan het tweede.

Tja het blijft wennen die Duits sprekende Maharadja's en dat dan ook eens in een niet-nagesynchorniseerde film.

The One Ring. Mochizuki Rokuro schreef : Ik zou ook nog eens moeten nakijken waarom Lang er toch aan begonnen is.

Waar blijft de versie uit op deze site? Zeker gezien een van de hoofdrollen de Maharadja door een Nederlandse acteur gespeeld werd, Frits van Dongen alias Philip Dorn, alias Hein van der Niet zou die hier toch te vinden moeten zijn.

Misschien is dat al zo? Een film die ik vroeger als kind heb gezien en nooit heb terug gezien. Zou die graag vinden uit jeugdsentiment.

Brix schreef : Waar blijft de versie uit op deze site? Barfly schreef: quote. Noodless schreef : bedankt voor de informatie , Brix.

Echt wel jammer! Deze film, en het vervolg, Das Indische Grabmal, zijn zijn een lust voor het oog.

De acteerprestaties zijn overigens allemaal niet echt om over te roemen. Maar de visuele kant van de film, met veel fraaie couleur locale, en evenveel Technicolorpracht is overweldigend.

Ik heb zowel de Duitse als ook de Engels nagesynchroniseerde versie gezien. Welke van beide beter is? Misschien toch wel de originele Duitse.

Al met al is het een leuke avonturenfilm, groots van opzet, met acteerprestaties die daarbij ietwat achterblijven.

The One Ring schreef : Wat een belachelijk lange tekst heb ik eigenlijk geschreven over twee toch vrij simpele films als deze. Dat komt wellicht omdat ik het gevoel heb iets te verdedigen te hebben.

Ik hoop dat in ieder geval meer mensen dit tweeluik een kans zal geven. Aardige avonturenfilm van Lang, die zich afspeelt in het verre India, waar het nachten sfeertje nooit ver weg is.

Het deed me ook heel erg aan The Thief of Bagdad denken, die ik recent zag, maar die laatstgenoemde is toch een stukje beter.

Der Tiger von Eschnapur ademt in ieder geval een lekkere sfeer uit. De settings zijn groot en zien er indrukwekkend uit.

Het acteerwerk en de personages zijn soms lekker overdreven aangezet, maar dat past wel goed bij dit soort films.

Het was wel even wennen om iedereen Duits te horen praten. Dat deed weer even terugdenken aan vroeger, toen ik nog wel eens nagesynchroniseerde films op de Duitse zender keek, wegens gebrek aan beter.

Maar ook daar was ik hier vrij snel aan gewend. Het oogt soms allemaal wat simpel en dan doel ik vooral op de personages en de dialogen, maar ergens heeft het ook wel weer een bepaalde charme.

Hoewel ik het nergens groots vind, verveelt het ook geen seconde en gaat het door het degelijke tempo allemaal toch in een redelijke sneltreinvaart voorbij.

Aangezien het tweede deel hier vrij naadloos op aansluit, heb ik de planning om die binnen nu en een paar weken ook te gaan zien.

Spetie schreef : Het was wel even wennen om iedereen Duits te horen praten. Ik houd heel erg van oude avonturenfilms en ik houd erg van Fritz Lang zijn werk.

Wat kan er mis gaan? Niet veel zo blijkt ook. De productie ziet er top uit mooie landschappen, fijn kleurgebruik, vele figuranten, wilde dieren, prachtige sets en het is lekker avontuurlijk.

Tunnelstelsels, Indiase paleizen, achtervolging door de woestijn. Top dus. Eigenlijk houd ik er niet zo van als films in tweeen of meer worden gebroken, maar het mag de pret nauwelijks drukken.

Op naar deel 2. Hoe komt het eigenlijk dat de verfilming uit , door Richard Eichberg niet op MM te vinden is? Die is uitstekend, en de rol van de maharadja wordt daarin zelfs gepeeld door de charismatische Nederlandse acteur Frits van Dongen alias Hein van der Niet die de eerste Nederlander zou worden die het als filmacteur in Hollywood maakte, onder de naam Philip Dorn.

Het schijnt dat er lastig een poster van te vinden is las ik ergens. Klopt, is ook bij andere films al gedaan.

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